Graphene controlled infrared terahertz waves

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The interaction between graphene and light suggests that this material could be used to control infrared and terahertz waves. “That would be a huge step forward for optoelectronics, security, telecommunications and medical diagnostics,” points out the Switzerland-based researcher.

A theory from 2006 hypothesized that if a Dirac material is placed in a magnetic field, it will produce a very strong cyclotron resonance. “When a charged particle is in the magnetic field, it moves in a circular orbit and absorbs the electromagnetic energy at the orbiting, or cyclotron, frequency, as for example, it happens in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN,” explains Alexey Kuzmenko. “And when the particles have charge but no mass, as electrons in graphene, the absorption of light is at its maximum!”

To demonstrate this maximum absorption, the physicists needed a very pure graphene so that the electrons travelling long distances would not scatter on impurities or crystal defects. But this level of purity and lattice order are very difficult to obtain and are only achieved when graphene is encapsulated in another two-dimensional material—boron nitride. Read full article here.

 

About the National Graphene Association (NGA)

The National Graphene Association is the main organization and body in the U.S. advocating and promoting the commercialization of graphene. NGA is focused on addressing critical issues such as policy and standards development that will result in effective integration of graphene and graphene-based materials globally. NGA brings together current and future graphene stakeholders — entrepreneurs, companies, researchers, developers and suppliers, investors, venture capitalists, and government agencies — to drive innovation, and to promote and facilitate the commercialization of graphene products and technologies.

 

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